U.S. KidsHumpty Dumpty MagazineJack and JillU.S. Kids Cover ContestForever-Fit

About Us

History:

The Saturday Evening Post Society, Inc., a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization, was established in 1976 in an effort to honor, preserve, and share its historical legacy of promoting the arts and literature, while inspiring and empowering individuals to embrace a proactive approach to physical, mental, and spiritual health.

The Society supports The Saturday Evening Post magazine, U.S. Kids family of magazines, including Turtle, Humpty Dumpty, Jack and Jill, and The Children’s Better Health Institute’s Forever-Fit Summer Camp.

The Children’s Better Health Institute (CBHI) is committed to improving the health and well-being of children. CBHI was established in 1976 in an effort to provide information and encouragement to parents, teachers, and health professionals in efforts to educate the general public on the fundamentals of good health. Our U.S. Kids family of magazines is designed to educate and entertain readers and to promote good health and fitness among all children.

Mission:

Our mission is to promote the healthy, physical, educational, creative, social, and emotional growth of children in a format that is engaging, stimulating, and entertaining at each stage of development.

Philosophy:

The Forever Fit Camp philosophy is based on the belief that children:

  • develop positive feelings of self-worth and inner-strength
  • learn to interact with others, respecting their rights and feelings
  • discover ways to make healthier life-long decisions
  • build up self-reliance and healthy independence, and
  • grow toward physical, emotional, social, intellectual and spiritual maturity…

In an atmosphere of structured and beneficial programs, with emphasis on freedom with responsibility, and under the guidance of caring adults who help children learn to make decisions and accept consequences for their actions, as they explore and find joy in learning about living a healthier lifestyle.

Testimonials

  • Campers-
    • “Exercising is easy, it’s just not sports.”
    • “I learned too much of a good thing can be bad.”
    • “Having a healthy life has so many benefits, and having an unhealthy life can give you so many health problems.”
    • “The thing I learned the most is how to try new things and how to eat healthier.”
    • “What I learned the most from this camp is learning my portion sizes and going playing for at least one hour a day.”
    • “I learned physical activity is fun.”
    • “I am more energized, and I sleep better.”
    • “I feel better.”
    • “I tried spinach, eggplant, mango, blueberries, and honeydew. They taste yummy!”
    • “Exercise is fun.”
    • “I learned different ways to work your heart and muscles.”
    • “I learned to eat healthy, read calories, and read nutrition facts.”
  • Guardians-
    • “I noticed my child’s excitement when it’s time to come to camp. I think he learned responsibility.”
    • “I believe it was beneficial for my daughter to spend a lot of time with other children who struggle in the same ways as her. It was also helpful in making her more accountable for her behavior daily.”
    • “I hadn’t realized how serious his obesity was. I have a much better understanding of his struggle.”
    • “The recipes are helpful. The support groups/parent nights help out a lot.”
    • “We’ve learned how to keep her active without her realizing she’s becoming physically fit.”
    • “Parents aren’t alone and we need to reach out for help.”
  • Professionals-
    • “I don’t think there is anything like this program in the country,” - Dr. Sandeep Gupta, Indiana University, professor of clinical pediatrics & director of Riley’s POWER Program
    • “I’m trying to establish a sense of well-being and getting them (youth) to try new fruits and vegetables. I want them to understand the value of food — physically and emotionally.” — Elise Lindstrom, R.D., Children’s Better Health Institute
    • “I think they’re eating when they’re bored. They often have free rein in the kitchen — nobody stops them. Portion size is a problem with many kids, too.” — Kelly Kimpton, Executive Chef, Indiana University Health, and volunteer at Forever-Fit Summer Camp